MassDEP Announces 2017 and 2018 Source Registration Information Reply

The MassDEP announced some much awaited information regarding forms and filing dates for Source Registration (SR) filers.

SR web forms for 2017 – including those for Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions reporting – are now available for certain Operating Permit facilities ONLY. These facilities have been notified that the deadline for filing their reports is June 21, 2019.

Filing of 2017 reports for other annual and 3-year filers is postponed until later this summer. MassDEP will notify these facilities directly of their due dates when eDEP is ready for them to file.

Filing for 2018 is postponed. MassDEP will notify filers directly when the 2018 forms are ready.

CAPACCIO can help you navigate the reporting system and deadlines and ensure you are including everything needed in this new process. We provide a full range of reporting services to meet your needs, from peer review to full submission. CAPACCIO’s EHS-DashboardTM can help you track your facility’s data collection and reporting so it is that much easier. Learn more about the dashboard at www.ehsdashboard.com.

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At CAPACCIO, we live our mission of “Helping Industry and the Environment Prosper”. We align EH&S with your overall business objectives to strategically position you for success.  Our unique approach combines our extensive EH&S experience with cutting edge technologies, such as our EHS DashboardTM, to effectively address your challenges.  Our comprehensive solutions have resulted in award-winning EH&S and overall business performance for our clients. We are certified WBENC, WBE. To learn more visit us at http://www.capaccio.com.

 

VW Emissions Settlement Funding Plan focusing on Clean Transportation and GHG Reduction released Reply

Massachusetts area businesses could potentially benefit from new grant money available for funding alternative transportation including electric vehicle charging stations, which is now available as a result of a recent settlement with Volkswagen (VW).

On December 7, the MASSDEP announced, along with the Attorney General’s Office and Baker-Polito Administration, the Commonwealth’s final plan on how it will use the first portion of the $75 million secured for Massachusetts from the national case settlement against Volkswagen (VW) for unlawfully installing defeat devices in certain model-year cars. The release includes an announcement regarding the $23.5 million in grants which have become available and the Beneficiary Mitigation Plan (BMP) which outlines how the funds will be used during the first phase of the 15-year timeline. The BMP was created after MassDEP held several public meetings and a comment period to ensure the plan includes smart investments in projects that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, drive innovative technologies and expand the clean transportation system.

Climate change and the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector have been priorities for the Baker-Polito Administration as well as the MassDEP, the Attorney General and countless others who are concerned with the adverse effects of climate change on citizens and their environment. This news is very encouraging to businesses who share these concerns and report to MassDEP on alternative transportation under certain air regulations such as MassDEP’s Rideshare Program. The grants can be used to curb the cost to businesses looking to drive these initiatives.

CAPACCIO is a leader in EH&S and sustainability and can assist with the grant applications for electric vehicle charging stations, and in developing and implementing alternative transportation programs, transportation surveys and reporting to meet MassDEP requirements.

For more information, please contact Travis Wheeler at twheeler@capaccio.com or 774-249-3246.

About CAPACCIO
At CAPACCIO, we live our mission of “Helping Industry and the Environment Prosper”. We align EH&S with your overall business objectives to strategically position you for success.  Our unique approach combines our extensive EH&S experience with innovative tools, such as our EHS DashboardTM, to effectively address your challenges.  Our comprehensive solutions have resulted in award-winning EH&S and overall business performance for our clients. We are certified WBENC, WBE. To learn more visit us at http://www.capaccio.com.

Climate Change and Sustainability in Massachusetts in the Current Political Climate Reply

Deregulation around climate change has had scientists, citizens, and organizations deeply unsettled in recent months. If looking from the outside in at the message being sent by the federal government, it appears that the U.S. has deprioritized sustainability and is actively revoking its support for the fight against climate change. It wouldn’t be out of place to think this, either. For example, in recent months, the U.S. has pulled out of the Paris Agreement, passed an executive order to revoke the Clean Power Plan, and most recently, the U.S. has revoked a ruling to ban hydrofluorocarbons (HFC’s) in refrigeration and air conditioning.

Regarding HFC’s…

  • On 8/8/17, a federal court ruled that HFC’s cannot be banned.
  • The reversal is due to a technicality in how the Clean Air Act is being used to support the EPA’s effort to ban HFC’s.
  • HFC’s have been and are of increased concern due to their high global warming potential, relative to CO2. In other words, for every one unit of CO2 removed from the environment, a one unit addition of HFC’s to the environment negates the CO2 removed from a global warming standpoint, and leaves the atmosphere with even more greenhouse gas (GHG).

But not so fast! There is a very different story unfolding in Massachusetts (and many other states around the U.S.).

First, for some country-wide good news related to the revoked HFC ban, despite this ruling, U.S. chemical companies are still committed to producing climate friendly HFC alternatives, per the Montreal Protocol in which approximately 150 countries vowed to phase out HFC’s beginning in 2019.

Meanwhile in Massachusetts, on August 11, 2017, Massachusetts published six final regulations to reduce GHG emissions in the Commonwealth. Granted, this was in response to a Supreme Judicial Court ruling (Kain v. DEP, May 2016), requiring the Commonwealth to “beef up” its emission reductions efforts. Enter Governor Baker’s Executive Order No. 569 – “Establishing an Integrated Climate Change Strategy for the Commonwealth” – and the resulting amendments (or new regulations) made to meet 2020 statewide emissions limits set in the Global Warming Solutions Act (GWSA). Below, those regulations are summarized, and more details can be found on the MassDEP website.

 

Regulation 310 CMR 7.72

Reducing Sulfur Hexafluoride Emissions from Gas-Insulated Switchgear (GIS)

What is it? Establishment of annually declining, mass-based limits added to existing max leak rates for SF6.
Who is affected? -Large utilities

-Federal reporting GIS owners

Why Was it implemented? Adding the mass-based limits is accounting for potential SF6 increased emissions associated with deployment of new GIS equipment – not accounted for prior to revision.

 

Regulation 310 CMR 7.73

Reducing Methane Emissions from natural Gas Distribution Mains and Services

What is it? Establishment of annually declining emission limits on Massachusetts gas operators in 2018, 2019, and 2020. This regulation establishes the annually declining limits on GHG emissions.
Who is affected? -All Massachusetts gas operators

-Gas operators with a Gas System Enhancement Plan (GSEP) order from Department of Public Utilities (DPU)

Why Was it implemented? Emissions limits were not established in the Clean Energy and Climate Plan for 2020. It simply required updates and fixes to leaks. Per the GWSA, limits needed to be imposed to ensure reductions.

 

Regulation 310 CMR 7.74

Reducing CO2 Emissions from Electricity Generating Facilities

310 CMR 7.75

Clean Energy Standard

What is it? Two regulations to reduce CO2 emissions from Power plants in Massachusetts.

7.74 sets a minimum percentage of electricity sales that utilities and competitive suppliers must procure from clean energy sources.

7.75 sets a sector-wide, annually declining limit on aggregate CO2 emissions from twenty-one large fossil fuel-fired power plants in Massachusetts.

Who is affected? -All owners and operators of an electric generating facility
Why Was it implemented? These two regulations are intended to increase procurement of clean energy (from utilities) and ensure emissions reductions associated with fossil fuel-powered power plants.

 

Regulation 310 CMR 60.05

Global Warming Solutions Act Requirements for Transportation

What is it? Establishment of annually declining aggregate targets on CO2 emissions from Massachusetts’ transportation system.
Who is affected? -MassDOT; MPO’s; RTA’s; DEP; EOEEA
Why Was it implemented? Previous regulation did not include requirements for the MassDOT to meet enforceable limits on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions.

 

Regulation 310 CMR 60.06

CO2 Limits for State Fleet Passenger Vehicles

What is it? New regulation setting limits on CO2 from passenger vehicles owned and leased by the Commonwealth’s Executive Offices.
Who is affected? Executive Offices that own or lease 30 or more passenger vehicles, as determined by the MassDEP.
Why Was it implemented? To reduce CO2 emissions from certain Commonwealth owned or leased vehicles through imposition of mass-based limits that decline each year from 2018 through 2025.   This requires each Executive Office to monitor, record, and report CO2 emissions from vehicles.

 

Industry in Massachusetts has stayed on course in terms of preparing for and doing their part to mitigate climate change through often extensive sustainability programs. Consistent with these efforts is the message that Massachusetts continues to stay the course as well, as evidenced by these new regulations.

For more information on this topic, please contact Cristina Mendoza at 508-970-0033 ext. 128 or by cell at 774-249-2418, or email cmendoza@capaccio.com.

U.S. Withdraws from Historic Paris Agreement – Industry’s Reaction Reply

As of June 1, 2017, the United States will be withdrawing from the historic 2015 Paris Agreement.

To refresh your memory, the Paris Agreement is a global climate compact in which almost 200 countries agreed upon the need to cut greenhouse gas emissions, and the actions to make this a reality. Actions from the agreement would keep the planet from warming by more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels – a scientifically agreed upon threshold that would safeguard future generations against the most catastrophic impacts of climate change.

This Agreement is a global effort, shaped by bold climate actions from each participating country. It is also shaped by commitments from the more stable members of the Agreement to provide climate finance assistance to poorer countries in the Agreement to support their transitions to renewable energy. All countries involved understand that climate change is an issue that transcends borders, and that efforts to combat climate change need to as well.

While President Trump announced yesterday that the United States will begin the years-long process to officially withdraw from the Paris Agreement, the business community is staying on course to combat climate change. Industry leaders from Facebook, GE, Apple, Tesla, and Microsoft, to name just a few, have outwardly expressed their disappointment with this decision, and plan to commit even more stringently to their climate change mitigation efforts.

A similar reaction has also been seen from state and local governments. Mayor Marty Walsh stated that Boston is still committed to, and even accelerating, its 2015 carbon neutrality goals. Governor Charlie Baker has stated that Massachusetts plans to focus on exceeding the state level goals of the Paris Agreement, and to continue economic growth from clean energy innovation. Governor Jerry Brown of California has similarly stated that California remains committed to the Paris agreement and is working with other states who are making the same commitment.

It’s not every day that industry, business, state and local governments, and the scientific community so urgently respond to a federal government action – but today seems to be that day – and the innovative and expedited responses from each of these sectors is more encouraging than ever.

To talk about what you and your company can do to join efforts to combat climate change, or for more information on this topic, contact Cristina Mendoza at cmendoza@capaccio.com