Federal EPCRA 313 Form R and Massachusetts TURA Form S Reports Due July 1 Reply

It’s that time of year again when companies are calculating thresholds for chemicals used in calendar year (CY) 2012 to determine if there are any chemicals manufactured, processed or otherwise used on-site that need to be reported under the US Environmental Protection Agency’s Emergency Planning and Community Right To Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313 and the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection’s (MassDEP) Toxics Use Reduction Act (TURA).

This is just a friendly reminder that there are a few changes for TURA reporting this year. MassDEP designated hexavalent chromium compounds and formaldehyde as Higher Hazard Substances (HHS )and lowered the threshold for reporting these chemicals to 1,000 pounds for calendar year 2012 (due July 1, 2013). It’s important that you take the time to review the guidance MassDEP developed for these chemicals. You may be surprised with some of the processes that you have to consider when determining thresholds for these new HHSs (e.g., fuel combustion, welding, formaldehyde based resins).

Also please note that zinc metal (without any fume or dust qualifiers) is back on the MassDEP TURA Chemical List. Zinc was erroneously taken off the list back in the late 1990’s. MassDEP has said they will not take enforcement against those companies who start reporting for zinc metal in this reporting year. Discussions are in progress at MassDEP as to the fate of zinc metal on the TURA Chemical List.
For more information on MassDEP guidance for hexavalent chromium compounds and formaldehyde please go to:

http://www.mass.gov/eea/docs/dep/toxics/laws/frmlguid.pdf

http://www.mass.gov/eea/docs/dep/toxics/laws/crviguid.pdf

If you need assistance with your reports or more information, please contact Lucy Servidio at 508.970.0033 ext. 114 or lservidio@capaccio.com or Travis Wheeler at 508.970.0033 ext. 115 or twheeler@capaccio.com.

When in doubt, wear a cape! Reply

On  May 3, 2012, I had the honor to present “20 Years of  Making the Toxics Use Reduction Act (TURA) work for business’ in Massachusetts” at the Cancer Council Autralia’s (CCA) Cancer in the Workplace – A forum on practical solutions for prevention. I was amazed at the feedback I received and of the hope my presentation gave to the attendees. I was even more amazed at the great research and presentations that I was asked to be part of. The presentations opened my eyes to Australia’s biggest occupational health issues of mesothelioma (working with/mining asbestos) and melanoma (sun exposure).

New Friends-Cancer Coucil Australia

I was able to attend a strategic planning meeting with the CCA. When I was about to leave they asked me to give my two cents of advice on how to get a TURA-like law rolling. I reminded CCA that TURA was first ignited by Ken Geiser (then at Tufts) and Mike Ellenbecker (then at U Mass Lowell) who were from acadamia…not the legislature. Maybe the Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology could be the starting point. Also, that starting off with Victoria, one state, rather than going country-wide would have a greater chance of success. Lastly, I said don’t forget TURA’s secret sauce…mandatory reporting/planning…voluntary implementation based on a viable business case.

Lucy Servidio The Cape Crusader

When saying good byes and giving hugs Terry Slevin, CCA said to me that they weren’t sure what they were going to get when we they asked me to come down to speak, but one minute into my speech they knew we had asked the right person…I remarked, “Did the cape frighten you?” He replied, “Not at all.” His only fear was that Dr. Tim Driscoll, Professor at University of Sidney, would start wearing one.

For those of you who have never wore a cape when making a presention, I would highly recommend it…it did make me feel like I could do or say anything!

It feels good to share 1

New Friends -Australian Council of Trade Unions

Today I met with the staff from the Australia Council of Trade Unions and Work Safe Victoria (our equivalent to OSHA).

I was welcomed warmly and was happy to share stories about TURA and how by getting workers involved in the TUR process so we can create safer work places. Though I did not have quantitative dollar amount saved in workman’s compensation claims and a direct correlation between TURA and a reduced percentage of cases of cancer, we all agreed that if we can reduce the amount of carcinogens used in the workplace and the amount of carcinogenic byproducts produced, it’s reasonable to deduce that the risk of workplace related cancer is likely to eventually be reduced.

Stay tuned to this blog for more insight from Lucy from her meetings and travels in Australia . 

It’s hard to say no to a Super Hero… Reply

 

I’ve been asked to present industry’s perspective on practical solutions to reducing toxics in the work place at a forum sponsored by the Cancer Council of Australia in Melbourne, Australia on May 3 2012. I’m following a presentation given in 2009 by Pam Eliason of the Toxics Use Reduction Institute (TURI) where she was introduced as having the answers to all of industry’s toxics use problems. I thought only a super hero could meet those expectations so I got myself a cape and now I am Super TURP ( Toxics Use Reduction Planner).

My super power is opening people’s minds to new ways of doing things. This results in using less toxic chemicals and generating less byproduct per widget manufactured. This mind bending ability can make companies more profitable and protect their greatest assets, their employees!

In order to prepare for my Australia presentation I attended a conference that  TURI held on April 12, 2012. I was interested in learning more about safer alternatives and attended the Green Chemistry track. I must confess, I had an ulterior motive to attending the conference. I wanted to get interviews with TUR Planners about their successes with TUR planning so that I could share them with the folks in Australia.

I decided to wear my Super TURP cape to the conference in order to get street cred, or maybe sympathy, from the crowd. It worked! I was able to get 10 companies to give me their input on what they think is the biggest benefit is to using the TUR planning process in their companies.

Please listen to the comments from Cindy Keegan, Manager, Environmental, Health& Safety Analogic Corporation and David Kiddo, Global Business Manager, Wire & Cable, Alpha Gary by clicking on each of the play buttons below.

Comments from Cindy Keegan

Comments from David Kiddo

Isn’t it great that Australia is looking to Massachusetts as a model for reducing cancer in the workplace? I’m proud to be representing TUR Planners and spreading the good word about the Toxics Use Reduction Act (TURA).

Need some assistance in making your company’s TUR Plan leap over tall buildings in a single bound…reduce payback periods…open up TUR Team minds to new ideas…we have a team of super heroes at CAPACCIO…just waiting to wear our cool capes!

Look for future blogs from down under …there will be photos with emus…maybe…Lucy

(Right) CAPACCIO’S Lucy Servidio with the Photofabrication Engineering TUR Team

CAPACCIO’s Travis Wheeler…Boy Wonder (Helping companies reduce the use of toxic chemicals)